Saturday, February 24, 2007

excerpt from Stickley's CRAFTSMAN HOMES 1909


CRAFTSMAN HOMES 1909
Gustav Stickley
A book of house plans and design. Many, many drawings, some in color, some of which are included here.
Most of the book deals with house designs, there isn’t much about the use of color or furnishings, but I’ve copied some information about 3 illustrated floor treatments.
The link to the book is at the bottom of the article


A dining table shown with crossed scarves, a favorite Craftsman table treatment




The first of the three floors illustrated here is meant to complete the color scheme of a room in which the woodwork is of silver-gray maple and the furniture and decorations are in delicate tones such as would naturally harmonize with gray. The floor is very simple in design, having a plain center of silver-gray maple that is finished exactly like the wood- work of the room. Around the edge is a wide horder of “mahajua” , a beautiful Cuban hardwood,, close and smooth in grain and left in its natural color, which is a greenish gray slightly darker than the finish of the maple.

The second floor is made of quartered oak in the natural color, and the boards are bound together with keys of vulcanized oak. Where the floor is stained to match the woodwork in tone, the color value of boards and keys will remain the same, as the vulcanized oak keys will simply show a darker shade of whatever color is given the boards of plain oak.

The last illustration shows a floor of quartered oak in the natural color combined with vulcanized oak and white maple to form a border in which a primitive Indian design appears.
A low wainscoting


A tiled kitchen with a built in cupboard and sink. Note that this is for an expensive home, tiling the wall cost quite a bit in 1909.


Another picture of the kitchen


Pictures were not hung on the walls of rooms with large friezes.


Showing a stenciled frieze




CRAFTSMAN HOMES

2 comments:

Marg. said...

Love this resource!

Our home is a 1915-17 probable kit house, allegedly a Sears.

Megan Shaw said...

You have a great site! I am linking to it from my blog: http://design243.blogspot.com/ - I teach a Modern Design History & Theory class (focused on interiors) and my class is responsible for keeping a blog on certain topics. Please feel free to stop by.